Gaming Your Way to Medication Safety

Track: Innovation

Session Number: 2041
Date: Mon, Sep 25th, 2017
Time: 4:15 PM - 5:15 PM

Description:

Since the Institute of Medicine (IOM) report “To Err is Human” in 1999, patient safety and education to prevent medical errors has been critical to healthcare. Additionally, regulatory and accreditation bodies have set standards to improve the quality of health care organizations to help provide safe patient care across all settings. Despite numerous efforts, medical error rates do not seem to be improving. For example, in 2000, the IOM report stated that up to 98,000 deaths occur as a result of medical errors.1 More recently, Makary and Daniel state that the numbers were actually underestimated and report a mean rate of death from medical error of 251,454 a year. This would make medical errors the 3rd most common cause of death in the United States for 2013.2

Continued efforts to improve technology and identify gaps in system processes must be made; however, education can also make an impact. A randomized control trial conducted by Shaw et al. compared the effectiveness of an online Spaced Education (SE) program to an online slide show followed by a quiz on intern behavior around Joint Commission National Patient Safety Goals. While each program showed improvement in knowledge retention, the SE program demonstrated an impact in confidence and behavior change. Participants also found the SE program to be more engaging and relevant.3

Other instructional strategies that promote learner engagement are gamification and game-based learning. Gamification is the use of elements of game design, such as leader boards and competition, to increase user engagement.4 Game-based learning, which uses relevants aspects of games such as “Bingo”, in a learning context has been used in healthcare education for awhile.5,6 Games can bring enjoyment to the learner, encourage participation, engage the learners’ emotions, and their intellects.5 Using these strategies together within a curriculum to give learners options to choose based on their learning style can enhance staff education of compliance topics.

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center Division of Pharmacy has historically trained staff on patient and medication safety compliance issues using eLearning modules followed by quizzes. A review of the curriculum found that the training needed to be more engaging and sustainable to improve retention. The revised curriculum is a blended learning style composed of gamification, game-based learning, and live question and answer sessions about compliance topics given over time.

This session is designed as a skill building workshop to give attendees the opportunity to explore and practice the skills of gamification (applying the game design techniques and game mechanics to engage and motivate learners) and game-based learning (learners explore the relevant aspect of games in a learning context) and their use in compliance and regulatory topics such as medication safety and quality assurance. An interactive discussion will focus on topics such as collaboration with institutional quality teams to identify medication safety issues, the success and failures of gamification and game-based learning, and their applicability in learning about medication safety issues.
1. Kohn LT, Corrigan JM, Donaldson MS, eds. To err is human: building a safer health system. Washington DC: National Academy of Sciences, 2000.
2. Makary MA, Daniel M. Medical error-the third leading cause of death in the US. BMJ. 2016 May 3;353;i2139. doi 10.1136/bmj.i2139
3. Shaw TJ, Pernar LI, Peyre Se, et al. Impact of online education on intern behavior around joint commission national patient safety goals: a randomized trial. BMJ Qual Saf. 2012 Oct;21(10):819-25. Epub 2012 Jun 16.
4. Nevin CR, Westfall AO, Rodriguez JM, et a. Gamification as a tool for enhancing graduate medical education. Postgrad Med J. 2014 Dec;90(1070):685-93. doi: 10.1136/postgradmedj-2013-132486. Epub 2014 Oct 28.
5. Teiner D, Bujas-Bobanovic M, et al. Game-based versus traditional case-based learning: comparing effectiveness in stroke continuing medical education. Can Fam Physician. 2010 Sep;56(9):e345-51
6. Foss B, Mordt Ba P, et al. Medication calculation: the potential role of digital game-based learning in nurse education. Comput Inform Nurs. 2013 Dec;31(12):589-93; quiz 594-5. doi: 10.1097/01.NCN.0000432130.84397.7e.
Session Type: Skill Building Workshop

Learning Objective 1: Summarize a strategy to include game-based learning or gamification in a compliance curriculum.
Learning Objective 2: Select gamification and game-based learning for a compliance issue within their organization.
Learning Objective 3: Integrate gamification or game-based learning into a compliance curriculum

Session Type: Skill Building Workshop

Learning Objective 1: Summarize a strategy to include game-based learning or gamification in a compliance curriculum.
Learning Objective 2: Select gamification and game-based learning for a compliance issue within their organization.
Learning Objective 3: Integrate gamification or game-based learning into a compliance curriculum